Blogs tagged with "marketing"

On January 1, 2010, a post on Facebook from Polar Bears International reminded me of an old proverb I once read (and wrote down) from the chalkboard at a science center where I attended special classes:
There are three kinds of people:
  • those who MAKE things happen
  • those who WATCH things happen
  • those who wonder WHAT HAPPENED?
For my whole life, I have longed to be the one who makes things happen. And for the last three years, I've been pushing new web design, new technology, and social media to a marketing department that is still firmly rooted in newspapers and "the big three" TV networks. As a geeky web-developer-turned-web-marketer, I encounter many frustrations with "the way we always do things," and I am continuously told to be patient and focus on change via "baby steps." Baby steps are very painful for a goal-oriented new-technology-driven overachiever. In the past it would have driven me right out the door.
Then I WALK out the door... and survey my workplace. I WORK at a ZOO. This is why I took this job. I am surrounded by the wonders of nature. I am continuously influenced by people who ARE working to make change. They give me faith that the world can be a different place - a place where we respect all living things and the world we share. When I start believing I'm useless, one of those people tells me he/she appreciates what I'm doing. It's inspiration to get up and fight for one more day. It's not hard to find.
A friend and fellow triathlete on Twitter sent me a link to read on New Year's Eve after we had a discussion about "inspiration." It is a blog article from Seth Godin: Seven Years Gone. It gave me hope. Hope that it's ok to respectfully bow out of the gossipy conversations, to put my headphones on instead of listening to "what happened on American Idol last night," or to not go out drinking just to have drinking stories to tell at the office. It may not get me promoted, but in seven years, will that really matter? My job, my passion, is to get our Zoo message to the people (and isn't that what marketing is all about?). And later that day, when I struggle to get my swim, bike, or run in, I'll remind myself that the alternative is to do nothing and watch my life go by.
It's 2010. Find your inspiration. And Happy New Year.
On January 1, 2010, a post on Facebook from Polar Bears International reminded me of an old proverb I once read (and wrote down) from the chalkboard at a science center where I attended special classes:

Most of you may already know I work in the marketing department at Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. My main responsibilities include the Zoo's website and social media presence, photography and video. If you love animals, working for a Zoo is a reward in and of itself. But all jobs have their issues. I could tell you a million things that are stressful in trying to market a Zoo, and both zoo and non-zoo fans could probably guess many of them. But today, I just want to write about how, as internet marketers, we try and try and try to give people what they want, we try to serve up information for them in several outlets and formats, and yet, they will still find things to complain about. I constantly wonder if it is a direct result of the instant-gratification society we live in or if it just has to do with my views of society as I age (there's that word again, "aging"). Will it get worse as time goes on? And, why is it that we can have many people giving us a thumbs-up on Facebook, and yet we can't shake off the sarcastic and negative comments?

I encounter the same thing with my personal social media sites. I love going to concerts and I love to take photos and video, but sometimes, I just like to enjoy the show. After great feedback on my videos, I have felt a responsibility to my YouTube friends to keep supplying more. But now, when I upload several videos from a gig, instead of getting a "thank you" from people, they ask me if I have more video from the show.
Maybe it's just human nature. Maybe it's just MY nature in wanting to please everyone. I wish I could give out some lessons to be learned from this, but I'm still trying to get a grip on it myself.

Most of you may already know I work in the marketing department at Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. My main responsibilities include the Zoo's website and social media presence, photography and video. If you love animals, working for a Zoo is a reward in and of itself. But all jobs have their issues.

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